Tag Archives: gretchen rubin

What do you want to accomplish with your clean slate?

Different milestones throughout the year give us the feeling that we have the opportunity to make a fresh start. What gives you this feeling — your birthday, the New Year, back-to-school? What might you plan to start fresh in 2018?

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4 Ways to Stick to Your New Year’s Resolutions

Some 44 percent of Americans make New Year’s Resolutions, but although resolutions are fun to make, they’re hard to keep. To help yourself keep yours, try these strategies.

1. Be specific. “Make more friends” and “Strengthen friendships” are vague resolutions. Make yours more concrete; “Remember birthdays,” “Make weekly plans with friends,” or “No gossip.”

2. Write it down.

3. Review your resolution constantly. If your resolution is buzzing through your head, it’s easier to stick to it.

4. Hold yourself accountable. Tell other people about your resolution, join or form a like-minded group, score yourself on a daily chart — whatever helps make you feel accountable.

When we act in a friendly way toward others, they’re much more likely to act in a friendly way toward us. For a week, as you move through your life, look for ways to be actively friendly as you engage with store clerks, strangers on the street, and other people waiting in line. Not just pleasant, but actually friendly. Be extra polite, offer up a little chitchat, be quick to respond. See if the world behaves differently.

We all have areas of our homes that have gone stagnant. Maybe your fridge is covered with photos and notes — but you never see those things anymore. Maybe you have a table crowded with photos — but you haven’t looked at the photos for years. Clear out that space; make room for something new. That area of your home will spring back into life, and you may even get a second hit of enjoyment from those items as you move them out of their accustomed places.

  • Laugh out loud each day.
  • Let go of minor grudges.
  • Be easy to please.

Holidays can be tough. One reason: spending time with difficult relatives. Here are some strategies for keeping the find together pleasant:

1. Before you join the group, spend a few minutes thinking about how you want to behave. If you’ve had unpleasant experiences in the past, think about why they were unpleasant and what you could do to change the dynamics of the situation.

2. Avoid strife. Some families enjoy passionately arguing among themselves; however, most don’t handle arguments very well. There’s a time and place for everything. This may not be a good time for a family argument.

3. Don’t drink much alcohol. Alcohol makes some people feel merry, but it also makes some feel combative or self-pitying, or lowers there inhibitions in a destructive way.

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?