Tag Archives: Loophole-Spotting

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

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We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Tomorrow Loophole. Now doesn’t matter much because, because we’re going to follow good habits tomorrow, or next week or next month.

  • It doesn’t matter what I eat now, because I’m starting a diet tomorrow.
  • I’m definitely on track to finish my paper on time, because starting tomorrow, I’m really going to buckle down.
  • I’ll be really frugal in January, so it doesn’t matter if I spend too much in December.

Sound familiar?

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Questionable Assumption Loophole. We make assumptions that influence our habits — and often, not for the better. These assumptions often become less convincing under close scrutiny.

  • The label says it’s healthy.
  • If I go to class today, my instructor will be angry with me because I’ve missed so many times.
  • It’s too late in the week to start.
  • If I indulge now, I’ll get it out of my system.
  • Unless I can sweat for an hour, it’s not worth exercising.

Do any of these sound familiar?

Loophole-Spotting

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Moral Liscensing Loophole. We give ourselves permission to do something “bad” (eat potato chips, bust the budget) because we’ve been “good.” 

  • I’ve been losing weight steadily on this diet, so it will be okay for me to cut a few corners.
  • I’ve been so diligent about meditating; I’ve earned a day off.
  • I’ve done so much holiday shopping; I deserve to buy something for myself.
  • I’ve ordered a big salad of organic fruit with my pancakes, so my meal is healthy.
  • I went running today, so I should get a cookie. 

Sound familiar?

Loophole-Spotting

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Moral Liscensing Loophole. We give ourselves permission to do something “bad” (eat potato chips, bust the budget) because we’ve been “good.” 

  • I’ve been losing weight steadily on this diet, so it will be okay for me to cut a few corners.
  • I’ve been so diligent about meditating; I’ve earned a day off.
  • I’ve done so much holiday shopping; I deserve to buy something for myself.
  • I’ve ordered a big salad of organic fruit with my pancakes, so my meal is healthy.
  • I went running today, so I should get a cookie. 

Sound familiar?

Loophole-Spotting

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Lack of Control Loophole. We argue that we don’t have control over the situation, and circumstances have forced us to break a habit. However, we usually have more control than we admit.

  • Someone brought bagels to the meeting, so I had to eat them.
  • Traffic always makes me late.
  • These chips have been specially engineered by the food industry to be irresistible. 
  • My kids take up all my time.
  • We opened a bottle of wine, so we have to finish it.

Sound familiar?

Loophole-Spotting

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the Planning to Fail Loophole. When it comes to keeping our good habits, instead of fleeing temptation, we often arrange to succumb. We make a chain of little decisions that allow us secretly to engineer the very circumstances that we’ll find irresistible. 

  • I’ll just check my email quickly before I go to the gym … oops, I don’t have time to go to the gym, after all. 
  • I’m done eating for the tonight, but I’ll go into kitchen and look in the freezer. Just curious.
  • I’ll buy some cookies — not for me, but in case someone stops by.

Sound familiar? 

Loophole-Spotting

We often use loopholes to justify breaking our good habits. A popular loophole is the One-Coin Loophole. An ancient teach story asks, “Can one coin make a man rich?” You’d say no. But if you add one coin, then another, then another … a man becomes rich. In the same way, with habits, any one “coin” is insignificant, true, but we only develop good habits one “coin” at a time. 

  • I haven’t worked on that project for such a long time, there’s no point in working on it this morning. 
  • One beer won’t make a difference.
  • What difference does it make if I spend this afternoon at the library or at home on my couch? 
  • Why wear a helmet today? What are the chances that I’m in an accident today? 

Sound familiar?